Introduction

Visionary leader, highly respected teacher, healer, mentor, tireless advocate and champion of Rural Health, Dr Pat Farry was unmatched in his efforts and contribution to Rural Medicine and General Practice education. His vision of sustainable and quality health services for rural communities and small towns of New Zealand was through education. He devoted much of his career to advocating and lobbying for improvements and funding for rural medicine. The Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust was established in March 2010, with the purpose of continuing this legacy. › Continue reading…

Maternity and Obstetric Emergencies

To start with this week, I have some excellent news on the man from my last blog who had the lower leg amputation. He is doing well, and looks a lot happier with life now that the pain is at a level where he is able to sleep. The stump is still oozing but it is hoped it will dry up over time. Fingers crossed. › Continue reading…

Surgery in Siaya.

I am now attached to the surgical team spending a decent chunk of my time helping to patch up the consequences of road traffic accidents (RTA’s) which have left parts of the anatomy sticking in all directions they shouldn’t be. I guess the unfortunate part is now every time I hop in to a packed matatu I spend my trip day dreaming about the sort of injuries I would likely sustain if we crashed in the various contorted positions I find myself. On the brighter side, I have also been involved in some amazing cases and have really been able to get my hands dirty so to speak. › Continue reading…

Readjustment and Reflections

In two weeks I have gone from feeling completely out of my element in Vila Central Hospital to instantly feeling at home at Grey Base. I was greeted warmly with “Welcome back!”, “You obviously couldn’t get enough of us” and “Did I see you in the paper?”. › Continue reading…

Matatus and Maternal Health

Jambo from Siaya, Kenya! The new ‘mzungu’ (white person) has arrived in town. My first discovery about the Kenyan people is that they are very friendly and have super human seeing capacity. They can spot a mzungu from literally miles away. All I hear is a faint “mzungu, mzungu!!” and someone will be waving furiously in the distance. Or maybe I stick out more than I realized, given I haven’t seen a fellow mzungu since I arrived. After only a few days, passing taxi drivers started yelling “to Ulamba?” (the orphanage where I am staying) before I could even open my mouth…very convenient really. › Continue reading…

Traditional Tibetan Medicine and Final Days in Nepal

The snow has rapidly crept its way down the Annapurna range this week, and there is a definite chill in the air to indicate winter is on it’s way. I’m not sure where the last one and a half months went, it is a little bit sad to be leaving, but onwards it is for the next experience. › Continue reading…

Older news items

Back to top