Introduction

Visionary leader, highly respected teacher, healer, mentor, tireless advocate and champion of Rural Health, Dr Pat Farry was unmatched in his efforts and contribution to Rural Medicine and General Practice education. His vision of sustainable and quality health services for rural communities and small towns of New Zealand was through education. He devoted much of his career to advocating and lobbying for improvements and funding for rural medicine. The Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust was established in March 2010, with the purpose of continuing this legacy. › Continue reading…

What’s your Emergency?

After finishing up in Paediatrics, I moved to emergency care for two weeks. The emergency room was staffed by one doctor and a couple of nurses, one of which was also the ambulance medic if anyone had a call out. This was where I spent a lot of time as a first responder.  Often there is not enough staff to send a doctor in the ambulance. › Continue reading…

Play it by Ear

Another week done here in Tonga. This past week I’ve continued in paediatrics, which continues to be an experience in itself. Among things I managed to attend, were clinics dedicated to heart diseases specifically rheumatic heart disease.

One thing I have quickly come to realise is due to the lack of resources, managing paediatric heart conditions in Tonga is challenging. There is no access to echo – diagnosis and management is purely clinical with an ECG. You have to look for signs of disease. You have to listen and quite literally use the murmurs to play it by ear. › Continue reading…

The National Rural Health Conference 2017 is fast approaching. This year, held in Wellington the conference will host eight keynote speakers and six concurrent session streams over two main days, 31 March and 1 April 2017. Within these talks the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust will be well represented by last year’s scholarship recipients Jono Paulin and Anna Charles-Jones. › Continue reading…

Last Words by Jono Paulin

North Ronaldsay, Orkney.

After spending the fifth year of my medical degree in the Rural Medical Immersion Programme, and loving my time in a rural setting, I knew I wanted to continue to seek rural experiences on my medical elective. I also wanted it to provide me with an opportunity to explore a part of the world I hadn’t been to, as well as the ability to gain experience in a health care system that was comparable to New Zealands. This led to looking around the outer isles of Scotland for a rural elective. I emailed most of the outer isles but Orkney was first to get back to me hence why I chose to go with them. › Continue reading…

Life in the Kingdom of Tonga

The first week was eventful week for many reasons. I arrived in Tonga to begin my first placement at Vaiola hospital on Tongatapu island only to find I had arrived the same week as the passing of the the Queen Mother.

What this means for the Kingdom, is a royal funeral – I can’t say I’ve even been to one before. › Continue reading…

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