Recipients

Since 2011, the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust has provided 19 scholarships and grants to medical student recipients to pursue rural health educational experiences overseas.

Scholarships

Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Travelling Scholarship

First awarded in 2012, this is an annual scholarship for University of Otago School of Medicine 6th Year students for the purposes of their 6th year elective. It awards up to $10,000 for up to two recipients.

2015 Recipients

Jono Paulin

Jono Paulin
Hometown:
Dunedin
RMIP: Masterton
School of Medicine:University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Dunedin

A 6th Year student at the University of Otago School of Medicine. From August 2016, Jono spent eight weeks in rural Northern Scotland – Orkney Islands (NHS Highland – Balfour Hospital).

A previous Fulbright Scholar, Jono is also a previous recipient of other scholarships from the University of Otago, the GloagFitchett Memorial Medical Education Trust,the 15th International Philosophy & Psychiatry Conference and the New Zealand Society for the Study of Diabetes.

Follow Jono’s blog series:
Hospital Food
Wilson’s Disease
Time Well Spent
ORCADES

 

Anna Charles-Jones

Anna Charles-Jones

Hometown: Blenheim
RMIP: Masterton
School of Medicine:University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Dunedin

Anna is a 6th Year student at the University of Otago School of Medicine. From August 2016, Anna spent eight weeks in rural Northern Scotland – Orkney Islands (NHS Highland – Balfour Hospital).

Anna is the Co-Founder of Choose Kids, a charitable trust established to support vulnerable children in New Zealand through advocacy and research. The group brings together students from all disciplines at the University of Otago to tackle the very complex issue of child poverty. Anna is also the Present Director of Ignite Trust, a student-run organisation that carries out business consulting for not-for-profit organisations. In 2014 Ignite was the winner of the Supreme Award at the Trustpower Community Awards in Dunedin.

Follow Anna’s blog series:
Welcome to the Orkney Islands
The Ten Minute Appointment
Throw a street party, get to know your neighbours
Meet Bernie

 

2014 Recipients

Natalie Irving
Hometown: Fielding
RMIP: Masterton
School of Medicine:University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch and Dunedin

Natalie Irving

 

Natalie Irving began her seven week elective in Pokhara, Nepal at the Green Pastures Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre on 12 November 2014. The institution specializes in the treatment and rehabilitation of leprosy, disability reconstructive surgery and spinal cord injuries. After this she travelled to Siaya, Kenya to spend three weeks at the Siaya District Hospital where she lived on the grounds of an orphanage and learnt first-hand about communicable diseases. In particular she learnt about HIV/AIDS and how this affects especially women and children as the next generation of a community.

In late 2015 Nicola is currently a Trainee Intern at Christchurch Hospital finishing off her final months of medical school. Asked to reflect on the experience travelling to Nepal and Kenya with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Natalie reported back;

“In Nepal I helped to look after patients affected by Leprosy and spinal cord injuries in a small 45 bed hospital in Pokhara. Seeing the team’s resourcefulness and ability to ‘think outside of the square’ to help patients who had traveled hundreds of kilometers on foot to seek care was an incredibly humbling experience. For example using fish tank pumps, they created small negative pressure wound dressings to help heal pressure sores on patients’ feet and hands before they became so badly infected they would require amputation. This prevents the awful disfiguration patients with Leprosy are so often stigmatized and ostracised for.

“Kenya provided a totally different experience. I worked in a 240 bed district hospital serving a population of over 1 million. I helped care for those delirious with Malaria, emancipated by HIV/AIDS and for the numerous women presenting daily to the maternity ward. Before my elective I had never truly considered how differently the health systems in other countries would be and how this would impact patient care and health outcomes. Here patients must pay to be admitted and for any consumables or procedures required as part of their treatment. As a consequence late presentations are common and the consequences severe. Observing and helping manage such situations as eclampsia in pregnant women and severe necrotising skin infections provided some of the most important learning opportunities I brought back with me.

“Getting back in to rural areas and supporting smaller communities health is a definite goal after my elective and experience with RMIP in Masterton during my 5th year. I didn’t expect the sense of motivation I felt by the end of my 3 months in Nepal and Kenya. On landing back in New Zealand, I couldn’t wait to keep learning as much as I could to be equipped as possible when I finally graduate as a doctor. “

Follow Natalie’s blog series here.

Welcome to Nepal – Neverending Peace and Love
Living with Leprosy (Kustarog)
Damage Control and Septic Surgey
Tough Road to Rehabilitation for Spinal Cord Injuries
Traditional Tibetan Medicine and Final Days in Nepal
Matatus Maternal Health
Surgery in Siaya
Maternity and Obstetric Emergencies
General Medicine and Paediatrics

Read Natalie’s final report here.
Natalie Irving 2015 Elective Report – Introduction
Natalie Irving Elective report- Kenya_Siaya
Natalie Irving Elective Report – Nepal_Pokhara

 

Laura Hammersley
Hometown: Darfield
RMIP: Greymouth
School of Medicine:University of Otago, Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Laura Hammersley

Laura Hammersley

From 23 November 2014, Laura Hammersley spent seven weeks on Vanuatu at Vila Central Hospital where she hoped to gain clinical experience and an appreciation of medicine in a developing country and how doctors work to distribute their limited resources. This is the third successive year, that at least one of the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Travelling Scholarship recipients has been a ‘graduate’ of the Greymouth RMI Programme. Laura Hammersley so valued her time in Greymouth that she chose to spend the second half of her elective at Grey Base Hospital after returning from Vanuatu before eventually returning to Christchurch for her sixth year studies.

In late 2015 Laura is in her final year of medical school, studying in Christchurch. In her last 12weeks she will be working in the critical care areas (ED, ICU and Anaesthetics) and general practice. After this she is looking forward to starting work for the Canterbury District Health Board. Asked to reflect on the experience travelling to Vanuatu with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Laura reported back;

“The Pat Farry Scholarship allowed me to travel to Vanuatu for six weeks. I spent this time in the major hospital in Port Vila, working in a number of different wards. This was an incredible opportunity and I made many lifelong friends within the village and with other visiting students.

“My time in Vila Central Hospital was invaluable to my learning, teaching me the importance of good clinical diagnosis rather than reliance on investigations. This was my first trip overseas and it was amazing to come face to face with true poverty and lack of resources – seeing it second hand via the internet or television just does not do justice to how horrible the conditions in these places can be. While New Zealand healthcare is considerably better, I do hope to use the skills I learned in Vanuatu to help those less fortunate within my own country. For now, I have chosen to stay in Christchurch but in the future I plan to work in a rural area and will hopefully also be able to advocate for the poorest of our health community.”

Follow Laura’s blog series here.

Christmas with the pikininis                       
Readjustment and Reflections

 

2013 Recipients

David Neynens
Hometown: Glenorchy
RMIP: Balclutha
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch and Dunedin

David Neynens

David Neynens

From mid-November 2013 David worked for four weeks at the Lady Willingdon Hospital in Manali, India. He then travelled to Gibraltar where he worked for eight weeks at St Bernard’s Hospital. David is interested particularly in expanding his knowledge of emergency medicine believing that “core knowledge of emergency management of patients is especially critical in a rural scenario, where a patient’s outcome may rely on a single clinician’s competency, unlike in the larger teams seen in urban hospitals.”

In late 2015 David is at Timaru Hospital, completing an Orthopaedic rotation in his first year as a house surgeon. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to India and Gibraltar with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship David reported back;

“Overall, it was as much of a cultural experience as it was a medical one. The immersion into the hustle-and-bustle of Indian life is enough to give anyone an immediate culture shock, but through it I developed an immense appreciation of people and societies different to my own.

“As for the medical side of things, I received a huge amount of insight into some of the different challenges that face rural and isolated hospitals in different parts of the world. Equally so, there were some common themes that presented themselves as well: Gibraltar and Manali experienced difficulty with issues like staffing their hospitals and having access to specialties, both issues that I have seen during my time in New Zealand hospitals.

“I think that the variety of different things I saw on my elective gave me a bit of a leg up in working in a provincial hospital. Here in Timaru, we are required to work with a much more general scope of practice than in the larger hospitals. Getting the hands-on experience in hospitals like Manali and Gibraltar- where you can’t necessarily direct the tricky cases elsewhere- has granted me more knowledge and skills to treat whichever patient walks through the door here in Timaru.”

Read David’s final report:David Neynens – Final Elective Report 2014

Rebecca Craw
Hometown: Tauranga
RMIP: Greymouth
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Rebecca Craw

 

Rebecca Craw travelled to the Falkland Islands in February 2014 to be based at a small hospital in Stanley. She also took care of patients in outlying villages reachable only by plane or 4 wheel drive vehicles. In April she travelled to Kathmandu, Nepal to spend time in hospitals learning how to provide care for larger populations with limited resources. Rebecca looked to both experiences to increase her “passion for wilderness and rural medicine” and for the experiences to “broaden her knowledge base and skill set.”

This was the second scholarship that Rebecca Craw had been awarded by the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust. Earlier in 2013 a grant from the Trust assisted her to travel Bairnsdale, East Gippsland, in Victoria, Australia for a two week rural health exchange between Monash University and the University of Otago School of Medicine.

Read Rebecca’s final report:Rebecca Craw – Final Elective Report 2014

2012 Recipients

Nicola Shaw
Hometown: Christchurch
RMIP: Greymouth
School of Medicine:University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Nicola Shaw

Nicola Shaw

 

Nicola Shaw travelled to Ecuador to join the Cinterandes Foundation mobile surgical bus service for five weeks before also traveling to St Francis Hospital in Katete, Zambia.

In late 2015 Nicola is currently working in the Christchurch Emergency Department as a senior house officer. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Nepal and Zambia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Nicola reported back;

“On my elective I went to Ecuador, to be with the organisation called Cinterandes, who run a rural surgical bus that is similar to NZ, but poorly funded and most equipment is donated, and everything that is reuseable is reused. I spent 6 weeks with them, and when not out on the surgical bus I worked in a local women’s hospital doing obstetrics and gynaecology.

The second part of my elective took me to rural Zambia, where I worked in the St Francis Hospital, doing medicine and paediatrics. Again funding and equipment were extremely limited – it was very difficult to complete basic examinations such as looking in someone’s ears for lack of otoscope caps.

“I am working towards becoming a general practitioner, and so the wide and varied experience of my elective was fantastic for helping get a good broad knowledge base, as well as furthering my understanding of the difficulties faced by the rural communities in accessing healthcare. It means that in discharge planning I am more aware of the logistical issues faced by those we send home, and helps with planning appropriate follow up.”

Follow Nicola’s blog series here.

Blog Numero Uno
Hasta Luego Ecuador
Final Reflections on Ecuador
First Impressions of Zambia
A Day in the Life at a Zambian Hospital
Final Reflections on Zambia

Read Nicola’s final reports here.
Zambia at a Glance – Final Report by Nicola Shaw
Ecuador at a Glance – Final Report by Nicola Shaw

Kerry Short
Hometown: Matamata
RMIP: Greymouth
School of Medicine:University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Kerry Short

 

Kerry travelled to the Chitwan District of Nepal where she joined a travelling rural clinic based programme called “Hope and Home Nepal” before travelling to Katete, eastern Zambia for a six week placement at the St Francis Hospital and a four day placement with the Flying Medical Service in Arusha, Tanzania.

In late 2015 Kerry is currently working at Nelson Hospital. Kerry is currently on a 6 month rotation in paediatrics and is completing her Post Graduate Diploma in Child Health through the University of Otago. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Nepal, Zambia and Tanzania with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Kerry reported back;

“I was based in hospitals with very limited resources where reliance on good clinical judgement was paramount. It was truly medicine at the frontline with little access to specialist care and technology.  This proved to be eye opening, haunting and yet heart-warming experience. It was a steep learning curve but exactly the challenge I was looking for and my clinical skills were truly put to the test. These placements allowed me to grow in clinical confidence and had broadened my range of practical skills particularly in the area of paediatric and general medicine.

Joining the flying doctors in remote Tanzania was a highlight of the trip – it was a wonderful way to see how health care can be delivered to those in the most remote parts of the world. Some villagers were over 150km walk from the nearest healthcare and so being part of bringing it to their doorstep was remarkable. It makes you appreciate the healthcare opportunities we have in NZ. Overall, my elective was simply an indescribable experience which developed me as a doctor, person and global citizen.

I have chosen to spend my first few years as a new graduate in a smaller teaching hospital. My experiences on the RMIP programme and during my elective reconfirmed my love of rural medicine and demonstrated the benefits of learning in a hand-on environment  I fell in love with paediatrics while in Nepal and Africa as I spent much of my time on the children’s wards. As often the only “doctor” on the ward during my elective, I became comfortable with paediatric examinations, emergency care and confidently recognising ‘the sick child’ with visual assessment which has proved invaluable in my current role.”

Follow Kerry’s blog series here.

An Adventure Unfolds
Intro Nepali Medicine
A Different World
A Tough Week
Village Life
Changing Directions

Grants

University of Otago Rural Medical Immersion Programme exchange to Australia

Sue Farry with 2011 Grant Recipients James Heaton, Matt Restieaux and Thomas Kuperus.

The University of Otago Rural Medical Immersion Programme (RMIP) was established by Dr Pat Farry in 2007. An annual reciprocal exchange of students from Otago to Monash in Melbourne Australia began in the mid 2000s. Two Otago students spend two weeks in the East Gippsland Regional Clinical School in Bairnsdale and Sale. Two more students spend two weeks in the Rural Clinical School of Western Australia in Kalgoorlie. Four students from those schools come to a regional teaching centre in New Zealand.

In 2013, the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust and Mobile Health committed a further $8,000 to send four RMIP students to experience the exchange which in that year was named the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Monash/Western Australia Exchange.

 

2014 Recipients

Gracie Souter
Hometown: Auckland
RMIP: Blenheim
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Gracie Souter

 

In late 2015 Gracie is currently completing her Trainee Intern year in Christchurch, about to start soon as a Postgraduate Year One. Asked to reflect on the experience travelling to Australia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Gracie reported back;

“I spent two weeks on exchange in Bairnsdale, Victoria with rural medical students from Monash University during my 5th year of medical school in the RMIP programme.  I was able to stay with the other Medical students in their university flats and attended clinical placements both in the local hospital and at GP clinics.  It was really interesting to see how the hospital was run by a combination of local GPs and specialists, where most of the obstetricians and anaesthetists were also GPs.

During my GP placements I got to see patients by myself which was a great opportunity to chat with the patients and gain confidence in my clinical skills.  I also attended some of the students teaching sessions which was interesting to compare curriculums.

Although I am currently based in Christchurch and will be for the next few years, rural medicine is still something that I am very interested in pursuing once I have built up some core experience in a tertiary centre.  Being able to go over to Australia and experience rural medicine there made me realise that my positive experience of rural medicine that I had during my RMIP year wasn’t just unique to Blenheim and that I could go anywhere with rural medicine and have a great time.  Many thanks to the Pat Farry Trust for allowing me to have this great opportunity!”

Follow Gracie’s blogs here and read her final report MY TWO WEEK EXPERIENCE IN BAIRNSDALE by Gracie Souter.

 

Clare Ogilvy
Hometown: Christchurch
RMIP: Queenstown
School of Medicine: University of Otago, Dunedin

In late 2015 Clare is currently finishing up her TI year and will soon be starting work as a house officer at Dunedin Hospital. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Clare reported back;

Clare Ogilvy

 

“I was given the opportunity by the Pat Farry Trust to go to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia as a 5th year medical student for two weeks. At the time I was placed at Lakes Hospital, Queenstown. The two places couldn’t have been more different, one a beautiful lake side adventure town; the other flat, arid and full of mining workers. I found the experience very valuable, I learnt about how it was to work in a rural hospital serving a huge geographical area and got to see a different demographic then I was used to in Queenstown. I found the aboriginal health particularly eye opening and really value the opportunities I was given to learn about and be involved in aboriginal health while I was in Kalgoorlie.

The opportunity to go to Kalgoorlie provided a unique addition to my medical education, and I feel privileged to have seen some of the health care challenges faced by our closest neighbour. I hope in the future to return to rural medicine, and perhaps even Western Australia!”

Follow Clare’s blogs here.

Natalie Ron
Follow Natalie’s blogs here.

Meaghan Kelly

Meaghan Kelly

 

In late 2015 Meaghan is currently working as a TI in Hastings Hospital. At the moment Meaghan is in the middle of her obstetrics and gynaecology attachment, which is the second to last of the year. Meaghan graduates in December, after which she has a job as a PGY1 house officer in Hastings. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Meaghan reported back;

“The Pat Farry Trust scholarship allowed me to complete 2 weeks exchange in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia. I completed a week of Paediatrics and another week of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. It was an amazing experience in which I saw first hand a lot of pathology that is more extreme than we encounter here. I was involved in complicated deliveries, learnt neonatal resuscitation and in addition, got to experience ‘Wild West’ outback town life!
My time in Western Australia cemented my desire to work in a smaller hospital like Hastings, and continue to try and get as much hands on experience as possible further from the larger centres.”

Follow Meaghan’s blogs here.

 

2013 Recipients

John Fernando
Hometown: Paraparaumu
RMIP: Masterton
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

John Fernando

In late 2015 John is currently working as a surgical house officer at Taranaki District Health Board. Soon he will begin in the emergency department. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship John reported back;

“The Pat Farry Trust gave me the chance to get 600km in land from Perth to a mining town called Kalgoorlie. Here I worked with a local indigenous medical centre to provide care to people who traveled great distances to get to the clinic. It gave me an appreciation for the health disparities that the aboriginal and Torres strait peoples face and part of the solution – locally trained peoples providing service.

Taranaki has a large Maori population who still face the impacts of their loss of wealth from settlement of the area and the associated health disparities. Seeing the dire situation of the aboriginal peoples gives some perspective as to what we need to actively avoid. Making sure that all my patients are getting the best and most appropriate care.”

Read John’s report: John Fernando – Australia Report 2013 or his blog here.

 

Mary McWatter
Hometown: Ngatea
RMIP: Blenheim
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Wellington

Read Mary’s report: Mary McWatters – Australia Report 2013 or her blogs here.

Emma Thompson
Hometown: Auckland
RMIP: Queenstown
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Wellington

Emma Thompson

 

In late 2015 Emma is currently working in Taranaki at New Plymouth Hospital. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Emma reported back;

“I was placed in Kalgoorlie in Western Australia. This was an amazing experience that highlighted Australia’s rural health issues. It was good to compare New Zealand’s rural health issues as compared to the Australian system. Renal unit, Obstetrics and Aboriginal health centre was my main placement. I got experience in a setting that was like no other, with diseases and pathologies I had never seen before (and still haven’t working in NZ one year later).

It has made me appreciate the proactive Maori community that we often have and has made me appreciate resources that you can take for granted in New Zealand. It has also made me aware of social issues that I wouldn’t think of. For example diabetic patients having healthy diets for two days of the week only due to their rural address, lack of refrigeration, and low finances (and once weekly food shop). However it has also fulfilled my enjoyment of working in a rural area because I find the medicine much more rewarding and interesting.”

Read Emma’s report: Emma Thompson – Australia Report 2013 or her blog here.

 

Rebecca Craw
Hometown: Tauranga
RMIP: Greymouth
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Rebecca Craw

 

In late 2015 Rebecca is currently working in Timaru Hospital on a General Surgical run. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to the Falkland Islands and Nepal with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Rebecca reported back;

“The scholarship enabled me to travel to these two exceptionally remote places in opposite corners of the world. I learn’t so much about rural health and practising medicine with limited resources in both first and third world health systems. I gained numerous skills in assessing and managing patients without modern investigations and technology. In the Falklands I also gained valuable experience in initially stabilising critical patients for fixed wing medevac to tertiary level care.
The skills I learn’t help me daily in my current job. I use the problem solving I learn’t to assess all my patients without relying on detailed investigations. This is especially relevant when working in ED at night when laboratory and radiology services are on call only. As one of only two junior doctors in the hospital overnight, the experience I gained assessing and managing critical patients allow me to actively stabilise patients while awaiting senior staff to arrive in hospital. We also regularly transfer patients from Timaru to Christchurch hospitals via road and air and I now feel confident that my patients are properly stabilised and ready for retrieval. My plan is to become a rural GP and I will require these skills for the rest of my career so it was hugely valuable to be able to gain them at such an early stage, thanks to the help of the Pat Farry Scholarship.”

Read Rebecca’s report: Rebecca Craw – Australia Report 2013 or her blogs here.

In 2011, Queenstown Medical Centre (QMC) provided $5,000 for the Pat Farry Trust to administer and provide assistance for four RMIP students to complete the exchange.

 

2011 Grant Recipients;

Matt Restieaux
Hometown: Clinton
RMIP: Queenstown
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Christchurch

Mathew Restieaux

 

In late 2015 Matt is currently working as a house officer in Dunedin Public Hospital. Asked to reflect on the experience of travelling to Australia with help from the Pat Farry Rural Health Education Trust Scholarship Matt reported back.

“For the two weeks I was in Australia, I was based at the Sale branch of the East and South Gippsland Medical School. Sale has a large base hospital providing a large array of services including emergency, surgical, obstetric, orthopaedic, oncology and dialysis services. I was primarily based at a GP practice in a small rural town called Heyfield. It was approximately 30 minutes from Sale and has a population of around 2000. Its economy is primarily based around the diary and timber industries.

During my time there I had my own clinic room and had patients allocated to me in thirty minute time slots. I found having scheduled clinic appointments allocated to students and allowing them to do practical procedures was a very innovative way of teaching. In Queenstown I spent a lot of my time observing general practitioners in consultations. My experiences in Heyfield allowed me to put some of the techniques I observed into practice. Seeing my own patients gave me a sense of responsibility and made me feel like a part of a team.

In addition to my time in GP clinics, I spent a couple of days based in the emergency department at Sale Hospital. There I saw patients presenting acutely with a variety of conditions including iritis and cauda equina syndrome. The emergency department was often run by general practitioners and I was amazed by the scope of their practice. Once again my experiences there were overwhelmingly positive and it reinforced the appeal of a career in rural medicine.

In my time as a doctor to date I have gained a lot of experience in medical specialties, surgical specialties, emergency medicine and paediatrics. Next year I am going to complete a 6 month rotation in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and following this I am hoping to spend some time as an emergency medicine registrar. I am gaining experience and knowledge in this broad range of specialties with a view to being an emergency medical physician or general practitioner. The idea of doing one or both of these specialties in a rural area is also very appealing and I am strongly considering the rural hospital medical program in conjunction with GP training. I believe my experiences growing up in a rural area in combination with completing the Rural Medical Immersion Programme and having experiences such as those provided to me by the Pat Farry Trust have helped shape these career goals.”

Follow Matt’s blogs Hey from Heyfield and Freezing cold in Victoria

James Heaton
Hometown: Waihi Beach
RMIP: Queenstown
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Wellington

Follow James’ blogs here.

 

Thomas Kuperus
RMIP Timaru
School of Medicine: University of Otago Faculty of Medicine, Dunedin

Follow Thomas’ blogs here.